Trio
London Dry, Spiced Blend & Aperitif

Made in England
10%vol / 700ml x3
Description
The complete tasting set. Made up of LONDON DRY heavy with juniper but light with citrus, rounded off with a subtle woody undertone. SPICED BLEND using a duo of light and white Caribbean rums from Martinique and Dominican Republic as its smooth base packed full of buttery dark caramel and spices. APERITIF a special combination of botanicals, from the hedgerow to the vegetable carefully blended with the floral sweetness of Strawberries.
Taste

LONDON DRY Upfront Juniper berry, authentic woody juniper with more of a floral berry coming through the mid palate, coriander seed in the middle, finishing with woody spiced backnotes. SPICED BLEND Deep caramel, warming savoury spice, rounded honey sweetness, buttery throughout with a hint of tropical fruit. APERITIF Complex woody and herbal, full bodied guelder rose with slight floral characters. Sweet grape and subtle strawberry.

Serve

Simply serve 50ml LONDON DRY chilled over ice with 150ml premium Indian Tonic and a lemon slice / 50ml SPICED BLEND chilled over ice with 150ml premium Ginger Ale and a lime wedge / 50ml APERITIF chilled over ice with 100ml English Sparkling Wine and a dash of premium soda.

Our Botanicals & Spices
    Strawberries Guelder Rose Wormwood Rowan Berries Burdock Root Hawthorn Berries Red Grapes Gentian Root Rhubarb Root Fennel
    01
    Strawberries
    Fragaria × Ananassa: The quintessential British summer fruit. Juicy, sweet, tart and fragrant. We use the juice to really elevate these four characteristics which help bring out and balance the punchy botanicals. A beautiful natural pink hue.
    02
    Guelder Rose
    Viburnum Opulus: Can often be seen grown in gardens as an ornamental plant with its many white flowers, though it naturally prefers the hedgerows. A native botanical used for hundreds of years in herbal medicine, here it adds a subtle bitter and floral note.
    03
    Wormwood
    Artemisia Absinthium: A herbaceous perennial plant with fibrous roots, as its Latin names suggests is the main flavouring behind the Green Fairy. The classic anise bitter.
    04
    Rowan Berries
    Sorbus Aucuparia: Scarlet in colour and produced by this elegant tree in autumn is most common in Britain in the north and west. Its old Celtic name, 'fid na ndruad', means wizards' tree as it was once widely planted as a protection against witches. The berries add a distinct sourness.
    05
    Burdock Root
    Arctium Lappa Radix Bardanae: Traditionally used in Britain as a flavouring in the herbal drink “dandelion and burdock” it belongs to the sunflower family. A pungent flavour but one that is very crisp, sweet and mild.
    06
    Hawthorn Berries
    Crataegus Monogyna: The name haw, originally an Old English term for hedge (from the Anglo-Saxon term haguthorn, "a fence with thorns"). Commonplace throughout Britain. Raw, they are said to have the taste of little apples. Dried as a botanical they add sweetness along with some slightly bitter, astringent tones.
    07
    Red Grapes
    Vitis Vinifera: Provide the main sweetness and dark red colour. Counterbalancing the botanical bitterness perfectly to give a long rounded finish.
    08
    Gentian Root
    Gentianaceae: The name is a tribute to Gentius, an Illyrian king, who may have been the discoverer of its tonic properties. Complex and aromatic with notes of bittersweet herbs and subtle accents of vanilla, candied orange and spice with a delicately bitter finish.
    09
    Rhubarb Root
    Rheum Palmatum: Also called sweet round-leaved dock and is one of the few perennial vegetables in existence. It is a relative of the garden fruit that we eat. The root provides a distinct sour and bitter flavour with a characteristic nose.
    10
    Fennel
    Foeniculum Vulgare: Similar in flavour to licorice or anise, fennel has a fresh and earthy taste which adds a real savoury depth to the more bitter botanicals.
    01 Fragaria × Ananassa: The quintessential British summer fruit. Juicy, sweet, tart and fragrant. We use the juice to really elevate these four characteristics which help bring out and balance the punchy botanicals. A beautiful natural pink hue.
    02 Viburnum Opulus: Can often be seen grown in gardens as an ornamental plant with its many white flowers, though it naturally prefers the hedgerows. A native botanical used for hundreds of years in herbal medicine, here it adds a subtle bitter and floral note.
    03 Artemisia Absinthium: A herbaceous perennial plant with fibrous roots, as its Latin names suggests is the main flavouring behind the Green Fairy. The classic anise bitter.
    04 Sorbus Aucuparia: Scarlet in colour and produced by this elegant tree in autumn is most common in Britain in the north and west. Its old Celtic name, 'fid na ndruad', means wizards' tree as it was once widely planted as a protection against witches. The berries add a distinct sourness.
    05 Arctium Lappa Radix Bardanae: Traditionally used in Britain as a flavouring in the herbal drink “dandelion and burdock” it belongs to the sunflower family. A pungent flavour but one that is very crisp, sweet and mild.
    06 Crataegus Monogyna: The name haw, originally an Old English term for hedge (from the Anglo-Saxon term haguthorn, "a fence with thorns"). Commonplace throughout Britain. Raw, they are said to have the taste of little apples. Dried as a botanical they add sweetness along with some slightly bitter, astringent tones.
    07 Vitis Vinifera: Provide the main sweetness and dark red colour. Counterbalancing the botanical bitterness perfectly to give a long rounded finish.
    08 Gentianaceae: The name is a tribute to Gentius, an Illyrian king, who may have been the discoverer of its tonic properties. Complex and aromatic with notes of bittersweet herbs and subtle accents of vanilla, candied orange and spice with a delicately bitter finish.
    09 Rheum Palmatum: Also called sweet round-leaved dock and is one of the few perennial vegetables in existence. It is a relative of the garden fruit that we eat. The root provides a distinct sour and bitter flavour with a characteristic nose.
    10 Foeniculum Vulgare: Similar in flavour to licorice or anise, fennel has a fresh and earthy taste which adds a real savoury depth to the more bitter botanicals.
    Juniper Berries Coriander Angelica Lemon Peel Orange Peel Burdock Root Gentian Root Fennel Wormwood Orris Root
    01
    Juniper Berries
    Juniperus Communis: The berries are in fact not berries at all but pine cones of the female tree. The classic and must have gin ingredient - piney, floral and woody. An unmistakable flavour and smell.
    02
    Coriander
    Coriandrum Sativum: Not the fresh leaves that some can eat and taste soap, but the dried fruits - coriander seeds. Giving a nutty, warm, spicy and lemony citrus flavour. Evidence suggests that coriander has been cultivated since at least the second millennium BC.
    03
    Angelica
    Angelica Archangelica: The root, once distilled gives a wonderful earthy flavour. Slightly bitter with herbal tones it has a real aromatic characteristic and works in perfect harmony with juniper and coriander. The triumpervate.
    04
    Lemon Peel
    Citrus Limon: The taste is tart, but fresh and quite delicious, though its flavour is frontloaded and doesn’t linger on the palate. The oils contained in the peel have a higher citral and limonene content than the juice itself giving a stronger “lemon” flavour.
    05
    Orange Peel
    Citrus Sinensis: The word orange derives from the Sanskrit word for "orange tree". Just like lemons, the flavours in the peel are at their most concentrated especially once dried. Using sweet oranges, adds a sharp, tangy quality but with lovely underlying sweetness.
    06
    Burdock Root
    Arctium Lappa Radix Bardanae: Traditionally used in Britain as a flavouring in the herbal drink “dandelion and burdock” it belongs to the sunflower family. A pungent flavour but one that is very crisp, sweet and mild.
    07
    Gentian Root
    Gentianaceae: The name is a tribute to Gentius, an Illyrian king, who may have been the discoverer of its tonic properties. Complex and aromatic with notes of bittersweet herbs and subtle accents of vanilla, candied orange and spice with a delicately bitter finish.
    08
    Fennel
    Foeniculum Vulgare: Similar in flavour to licorice or anise, fennel has a fresh and earthy taste which adds a real savoury depth to the more bitter botanicals.
    09
    Wormwood
    Artemisia Absinthium: A herbaceous perennial plant with fibrous roots, as it’s Latin names suggests is the main flavouring behind the Green Fairy. The classic anise bitter.
    10
    Orris Root
    Rhizoma Iridis: Once distilled it retains its floral notes, but develops a distinct earthy and woody flavour which lingers long in the mouth before a sweet finish. It had the common name of Queen Elizabeth Root because of its historical use for feminine power, love and as a divination pendulum.
    01 Juniperus Communis: The berries are in fact not berries at all but pine cones of the female tree. The classic and must have gin ingredient - piney, floral and woody. An unmistakable flavour and smell.
    02 Coriandrum Sativum: Not the fresh leaves that some can eat and taste soap, but the dried fruits - coriander seeds. Giving a nutty, warm, spicy and lemony citrus flavour. Evidence suggests that coriander has been cultivated since at least the second millennium BC.
    03 Angelica Archangelica: The root, once distilled gives a wonderful earthy flavour. Slightly bitter with herbal tones it has a real aromatic characteristic and works in perfect harmony with juniper and coriander. The triumpervate.
    04 Citrus Limon: The taste is tart, but fresh and quite delicious, though its flavour is frontloaded and doesn’t linger on the palate. The oils contained in the peel have a higher citral and limonene content than the juice itself giving a stronger “lemon” flavour.
    05 Citrus Sinensis: The word orange derives from the Sanskrit word for "orange tree". Just like lemons, the flavours in the peel are at their most concentrated especially once dried. Using sweet oranges, adds a sharp, tangy quality but with lovely underlying sweetness.
    06 Arctium Lappa Radix Bardanae: Traditionally used in Britain as a flavouring in the herbal drink “dandelion and burdock” it belongs to the sunflower family. A pungent flavour but one that is very crisp, sweet and mild.
    07 Gentianaceae: The name is a tribute to Gentius, an Illyrian king, who may have been the discoverer of its tonic properties. Complex and aromatic with notes of bittersweet herbs and subtle accents of vanilla, candied orange and spice with a delicately bitter finish.
    08 Foeniculum Vulgare: Similar in flavour to licorice or anise, fennel has a fresh and earthy taste which adds a real savoury depth to the more bitter botanicals.
    09 Artemisia Absinthium: A herbaceous perennial plant with fibrous roots, as it’s Latin names suggests is the main flavouring behind the Green Fairy. The classic anise bitter.
    10 Rhizoma Iridis: Once distilled it retains its floral notes, but develops a distinct earthy and woody flavour which lingers long in the mouth before a sweet finish. It had the common name of Queen Elizabeth Root because of its historical use for feminine power, love and as a divination pendulum.
    Cassia Bark Nutmeg Vanilla Seeds Ginger Root Pineapple Orange Rind Burnt Sugar Molasses Blood Orange Allspice
    01
    Cassia Bark
    Cinnamomum cassia: Cinnamons bigger bolder cousin, with its own distinct aromatic flavour that is stronger and sweeter tasting with a woody aroma. The bark was first used as a cooking spice by the Greeks, Romans and ancient Hebrews.
    02
    Nutmeg
    Myristica fragrans: The seeds of the tree are dried gradually in the sun over a period of six to eight weeks. Producing the spice that has a distinctive pungent fragrance and a warm, slightly sweet taste.
    03
    Vanilla Seeds
    Vanilla planifolia: The spice is obtained from the pods of the orchids of the genus Vanilla - the word translated simply as "little pod". The flavour is somewhat sweet with a hint of smokiness and a perfumed warm aroma of wood and honey.
    04
    Ginger Root
    Zingiber officinale: The fresh rhizomes are juicy and fleshy with a slightly peppery yet sweet flavour. It has an unmistakable spicey pungency - a powerful spice. Grown all over the globe ginger is actually a true cultigen and does not exist in its wild state!
    05
    Pineapple
    Ananas comosus: A tropical plant indegenous to South America, with an edible fruit that when introduced to Europe in the 17th century became a significant cultural icon of luxury. A flavour that is wonderfully sweet and tropical with a slightly spicy and jammy undertone.
    06
    Orange Rind
    Citrus Sinensis: The word orange derives from the Sanskrit word for "orange tree". Just like lemons, the flavours in the peel are at their most concentrated especially once dried. Using sweet oranges, adds a sharp, tangy quality but with lovely underlying sweetness.
    07
    Burnt Sugar
    Cannamella: Sugar heated to over 200 degrees until molten and dark with an intense, bitter, smoky, yet sweet and alluringly complex flavour.
    08
    Molasses
    Mellaceum: The dark, sweet, syrupy byproduct from refining sugar. It’s one of the principal ingredients in the distillation of rum and so has a rich history in the Caribbean. It has the full robust flavour with hints of tobacco.
    09
    Blood Orange
    Citrus × sinensis: Is a natural mutation of the orange, which is itself a hybrid. They have a unique flavour compared to other oranges, subtly sweet and distinctly raspberry-like with hints of tangy red grapefruit and tart cherries.
    10
    Allspice
    Pimenta dioica: The dried unripe berry of the tree that is native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America. Also known as Jamaica pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta, or pimento. A warm tasting spice with hints of cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon and pepper.
    01 Cinnamomum cassia: Cinnamons bigger bolder cousin, with its own distinct aromatic flavour that is stronger and sweeter tasting with a woody aroma. The bark was first used as a cooking spice by the Greeks, Romans and ancient Hebrews.
    02 Myristica fragrans: The seeds of the tree are dried gradually in the sun over a period of six to eight weeks. Producing the spice that has a distinctive pungent fragrance and a warm, slightly sweet taste.
    03 Vanilla planifolia: The spice is obtained from the pods of the orchids of the genus Vanilla - the word translated simply as "little pod". The flavour is somewhat sweet with a hint of smokiness and a perfumed warm aroma of wood and honey.
    04 Zingiber officinale: The fresh rhizomes are juicy and fleshy with a slightly peppery yet sweet flavour. It has an unmistakable spicey pungency - a powerful spice. Grown all over the globe ginger is actually a true cultigen and does not exist in its wild state!
    05 Ananas comosus: A tropical plant indegenous to South America, with an edible fruit that when introduced to Europe in the 17th century became a significant cultural icon of luxury. A flavour that is wonderfully sweet and tropical with a slightly spicy and jammy undertone.
    06 Citrus Sinensis: The word orange derives from the Sanskrit word for "orange tree". Just like lemons, the flavours in the peel are at their most concentrated especially once dried. Using sweet oranges, adds a sharp, tangy quality but with lovely underlying sweetness.
    07 Cannamella: Sugar heated to over 200 degrees until molten and dark with an intense, bitter, smoky, yet sweet and alluringly complex flavour.
    08 Mellaceum: The dark, sweet, syrupy byproduct from refining sugar. It’s one of the principal ingredients in the distillation of rum and so has a rich history in the Caribbean. It has the full robust flavour with hints of tobacco.
    09 Citrus × sinensis: Is a natural mutation of the orange, which is itself a hybrid. They have a unique flavour compared to other oranges, subtly sweet and distinctly raspberry-like with hints of tangy red grapefruit and tart cherries.
    10 Pimenta dioica: The dried unripe berry of the tree that is native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America. Also known as Jamaica pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta, or pimento. A warm tasting spice with hints of cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon and pepper.

    Fancy a Drink?

    Decem Cooler - Makes 2

    50ml Decem London Dry
    50ml Decem Aperitif
    100ml Lemonade
    100ml Ginger Ale
    2 Strawberry slices
    2 Orange slices

    Fill the highball glasses with ice and add the remaining ingredients, one at a time, stir briefly to mix. Garnish with the fruit.

    <p>Decem Cooler </p>
    Spiced Negroni - Makes 2

    50ml Decem Spiced Blend
    50ml Decem Aperitif
    50ml Sweet Red Vermouth
    2 Orange slices

    Fill the mixing glass and two old fashioned glasses with ice. Add the DECEM Spiced Blend, Aperitif and vermouth to the mixing glass. Stir until the outside of the glass feels cold. Strain into the two glasses, add a slice of orange and sip away!

    <p>Spiced Negroni</p>
    Jungle Bird - Makes 2

    100ml Decem Spiced Blend
    50ml Decem Aperitif
    100ml Pineapple juice
    1 Lime, juiced
    2 dashes of maple syrup, to taste
    2 Pineapple wedges

    Fill the old fashioned glasses with ice. Add the DECEM Spiced Blend, Aperitif, pineapple juice, lime juice, and maple syrup to a cocktail shaker and fill it with ice. Shake vigorously until cold. Strain into the glasses and garnish with the pineapple wedges.

    <p>Jungle Bird</p>
    Complex flavours for easy drinking

    How we socialise together is changing rapidly. Alcohol is a beautifully, functional elixir but (like most of us know already) too much of it is never a good thing. DECEM is designed to be enjoyed anytime, as a lighter alcohol option which means you can keep the conversations flowing late into the night.

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